-->

You are here

EWPAA emissions message at Furnitex

At Furnitex Connect in Melbourne .. Robert Gunn, event sales executive, Andrew Lieschke, director, compliance assessment management,  Department of Agriculture, Simon Dorries, CEO, Australian Forestry Standard, Senator Richard Colbeck, federal Secretary for Agriculture, Stuart Hogan, assessing officer, biological import assessment branch, DAF, and Jim Bowden, representing EWPAA.
Visiting the EWPAA stand at Furnitex Connect .. Bryan Stanley, education and training officer, Australian Furniture Association, Tom Miller, marketing strategy, AFA, and Garry Chilcott, state sales manager, Polytec, Melbourne.

The Australian Furniture Association and respected skills trainer Chisholm Institute are considering ‘joining forces’ with the Engineered Wood Products Association to provide students with a greater understanding of product certification, building codes and compliance.

Furniture exhibitors at Furnitex Connect in Melbourne recently expressed interest in the EWPAA’s brand awareness program using adhesive labels to advise that products manufactured by its members are certified Super E0, E0 and E1 under a strict JAS-ANZ accredited system.

The Australian Furniture Association, convener of Furnitex, represents the interests of the furniture sector from raw material supply through to the end user. Collectively the industry supply chain employs more than 200,000 people nationally.

Education and training officer Bryon Stanley said AFA had partnered with the Australasian Furnishing Research and Development Institute (AFRDI) to provide standards, testing, product certification and research for buyers and sellers of furniture.

“Furntech-AFRDI embraces the concept of sustainability through the creation of a furniture sustainability standard and the implementation of in-house policies and practices that mitigate environmental impacts,” Mr Stanley said.

“To us, sustainable practices are fundamental to the future of our industry, and to the environment,” he said.

“Commercial furniture manufacturers more and more must conform to ‘green’ specifications and tender requirements in both the commercial and government sectors. Non-compliance means that, in time, they may potentially be excluded from much of the marketplace.”

The AFRDI Green Tick is a Green Building Council of Australia recognised product certification scheme that corresponds with furniture and assemblies.

Melbourne’s Chisholm Institute at Frankston, which trains more than 40,000 students each year, is placing greater emphasis on regulations and standards. This week the institute is hosting a meeting of the Cabinet Makers and Designers Association at its new $18.5 million trade training centre at the Frankston campus.